“Beauty for Ashes”

"Beauty for Ashes"

January 2019, wood ashes and acrylic on metal

Most of the things I make are meaningful to me in some way, and this piece is no exception. The tree is made entirely out of ashes and glue, and it is meant to represent a time of sadness or mourning, out of which God will bring growth, joy, and peace. The tree is certainly not dead, and when springtime arrives, it will burst into bud, stronger and more beautiful than ever before.

I’d imagine that most people can relate to the “beauty for ashes” theme in some way. But for me personally, there have been many piles of metaphorical ashes in my life, but there hasn’t been a single one that Jesus has failed to turn into something beautiful.

I started out with a bare piece of galvanized metal that had the edges rolled to the back so it wouldn’t be sharp. I cleaned it with acetone, and then added a background of night sky and snowy rolling hills. I used acrylic paint in white, midnight blue, metallic silver, and metallic black. I feel like the metallic colors in the sky give it a little bit of shimmer, and lend it that cold, clear feeling that the sky takes on in winter. I wrote in some text taken from Isaiah 61, and when I was happy with the background, I let it dry and gave the whole thing a couple of coats of Mod Podge so that I could wipe off the ashes more easily if I made a mistake while I was adding the tree.

I mixed wood ashes with a little bit of water until it was the consistency of thin paint. Then I added Mod Podge (about 2 parts ashes/water and one part Mod Podge, but I didn’t measure anything) and mixed it well. This gave me a mixture that was about the consistency of pudding.

Note: You could certainly use a different type of glue, but if your glue isn’t water-based, you can’t mix the ashes with water. And if you use oil paints, you won’t be able to make water-based glue or sealant stick to it. So make sure that whatever materials you’re using are all compatible with each other.

I started by roughing in the “bones” of the tree, and then went back and added coat after coat of ashes to build the tree up to a textured 3-D shape, letting it dry thoroughly after each coat. The ashes mixture is a different color before it’s dry, as you can see in the photos. If you make a mistake, a damp Q-tip makes a good eraser. When I was getting to the finer tips of the branches, I switched to using a toothpick instead of a brush.

When I was done with the tree, I gave the whole thing two more coats of Mod Podge to seal it and protect the ashes. I curled the ends of a picture hanging wire (to help it grab the adhesive better) and attached it to the back of the piece using E-6000 adhesive. I also added foam squares on the corners to keep the metal from scuffing the wall.

"Beauty for Ashes"

I really like the way it turned out. I feel like I literally made beauty out of ashes, like how the passage talks about beauty being made from metaphorical ashes. It symbolizes something that’s close to my heart, and I hope you enjoyed seeing it as well.

Jessie

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About SnazzyBot

I am an artist and fashion designer with a passion for helping people bring their own creative dreams to life. I love sharing my projects with fellow crafters, and I hope you find ideas and inspiration on my blog! As an Amazon affiliate, I earn a small commission (at no extra cost to you) if you use my affiliate links to make a purchase.

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